High Ability

Honors at Nebraska

At the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, we know you have the potential to be a world-changer some day and we want to help you get there. We want to help you grow into the very best version of yourself.

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University Honors

The University Honors Program offers top students in all majors opportunities to enhance their educational experience and distinguish themselves. University Honors students enjoy small classes, work closely with faculty on coursework and undergraduate research projects, belong to a community of high-achieving student leaders on campus, receive mentorship from upperclass Honors students, have opportunities to live in Honors housing, and are eligible for Honors-specific scholarships. This customizable program offers students the advantages of a leading research university with the benefits of a small, liberal arts environment.

Raikes

The Jeffrey S. Raikes School of Computer Science and Management is a leader in interdisciplinary education and innovation. Each year the Raikes School selects a cohort of 30-35 high achieving students with demonstrated interest in technology and business. Driven by a project-oriented curriculum and real-world application and alongside industry and community partners, students leverage design and model thinking to develop human-centered solutions to wicked problems.

CBA Honors Academy

The College of Business Administration Honors Academy is a four-year, cohort-based, enhanced business leadership program for high-ability students who have the potential and desire to become the next generation of business leaders. Each year the Academy selects 40-45 students who complete most of their foundation and core business courses together as a cohort using an action-based learning style focused on the development of critical thinking, technical and communication skills. Students learn to develop solutions for real-world business problems and create social and intellectual bonds.

Honors Application Instructions

At NEBRASKA, it's all here: three prestigious, tight-knit Honors communities within a larger University system that has the resources and opportunities you need to continue to succeed. Prepare to apply by reviewing the instructions below.

Application Instructions

Before You Apply

  • Review whether you are eligible for the honors program you're interested in.
  • Know the deadlines for applying.
    • Priority consideration deadline for all honors programs: November 15
    • The Raikes School and CBA Honors Academy may reach capacity following the November 15 application review period. We recommended you contact these programs for more information about program admission.
  • See our application tips for completing the short answer, resume and essay questions.
  • Be prepared with a list of courses you plan to take your senior year of high school and any courses you've taken for college credit.
  • Keep in mind, there are a limited number of spaces available in each program.

Apply For Admission

  • Fill out Application
  • Within five working days, you will receive an email with your NU ID number & your temporary TrueYou password.

Log into TrueYou

  • Log in to TrueYou and set your MyRed Password.

Apply for the Honors Program

  • Log into MyRed to apply for the Honors Program.

Receive Notification

  • Notifications regarding honors program status will be sent to the email address provided on the application for admission. Please ensure that the address provided is current and is the best way to reach you.

Transfer Application Instructions

Before you Apply

  • Review whether you are eligible for the honors program you're interested in.
  • See our application tips for completing the short answer, resume and essay questions.
  • Keep in mind, there are a limited number of spaces available in each program.

Apply for Admission


Complete a Transfer/Upper-class Honors Application


Submit your 250-word essay

  • Part of the transfer/upper-class honors application.

Provide 1 Letter of Recommendation

  • Should be from a person familiar with your academic performance.

Submit Supporting Admission Materials by the due dates:

  • Fall semester: March 1
  • Spring semester: October 1

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis after the initial deadline.


Application Tips

Resume

Your resume is how you provide faculty and staff reviewers information about your academic interests, skills, and other relevant experiences that make you an appealing candidate for the honors programs.

For the purpose of this application process, your resume should be comprehensive but brief. It's not necessary to spend a lot of time describing experiences unrelated to academics.

Be sure to include:
  • Leadership experiences with details about your role in the activity.
  • Volunteer and extracurricular activities.
  • Relevant work experience.
  • Awards, honors, and scholarships.
Formatting Tips
  • Resumes should be 1 page in length (samples are provided below for reference).
  • Be aware that the application form removes all formatting, so it's important to keep your text layout as simple as possible.
  • To see how it will appear for faculty and staff reviewers, copy and paste your resume into a plain text editor (e.g., Notepad for Windows users, TextEdit in plain-text mode for Mac users).
  • You can use simplified bullets, all caps, and line breaks to indicate headings or to draw attention to important information.

Short Answer

The short answer section consists of several questions—one optional.

Required for all applicants:
  • Select one of your service or extra-curricular activities and describe what the experience meant to you in 250 words or less.
  • Indicate your professional goals. Please be specific and limit your response to 25 words or less.
Required for Raikes School and CBA Honors Academy applicants:
  • Describe your computer science and business experience, including course-related experience, work experience and extra-curricular activities in 250 words or less.
Optional:
  • If there is anything else you would like to include in your application, such as an unusual circumstance or special information about yourself that would be relevant, please describe it.
  • The optional short answer question is an opportunity for you to share anything unique about yourself or your experiences that would help faculty and staff to get to know you better. You may also use this space if there is something that needs further explanation not addressed in the other application questions, such as an academic deficiency.

The short answer responses should be prepared in advance. Be aware that the application form removes all formatting, so it's important to keep your text layout as simple as possible. To see how it will appear for faculty and staff reviewers, copy and paste your response into a plain text editor (e.g., Notepad for Windows users, TextEdit in plain-text mode for Mac users).


Essay

The essay section asks for an answer to 1 of 5 Common Application* questions. It's recommended that you choose the essay prompt that best allows you to tell faculty and staff reviewers something about you that they won't get from your high school transcripts and test scores. The word limit is 650 words.

  • Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  • The lessons we take from failure can be fundamental to later success. Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?
  • Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?
  • Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.
  • Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

The essay response should be prepared in advance. Be aware that the application form removes all formatting, so it's important to keep your text layout as simple as possible. To see how it will appear for faculty and staff reviewers, copy and paste your response into a plain text editor (e.g., Notepad for Windows users, TextEdit in plain-text mode for Mac users).

*Reprinted with permission of the Common Application.


Education

  • Included the full name of your high school, city, state and years attended.
  • Include your GPA, rank, and your scores for the PSAT and SAT/ACT.

Leadership

  • Include specific activities where your leadership has been demonstrated.
  • Activities may be from coursework, community service, work/internships, athletics, etc.
  • Activities may be ongoing engagements or one-time instances.
  • Describe your activities and involvement in specific organizations or groups.
  • Include the year (9, 10, 11, 12) in which the activity took place.

Extra-Curricular Activities

  • Consider using categories to group activities if you have multiple years and events (e.g. athletics, community service).
  • Include the year in which you participated in the activity and list the most recent activities first.

Work Experience/Internships

  • Use only if applicable.
  • Include the year (9, 10, 11, 12) and the number or hours worked per week.

Awards/Honors/Scholarships

  • Use only if applicable.
  • Include the year (9, 10, 11, 12) and the number or hours worked per week.

Sample Resumes


Faculty & Resources

At NEBRASKA you'll find professors who care about you, who push you to be the best and give you the chance to work alongside them. NEBRASKA is the perfect size—big enough to have the faculty, resources, and opportunities you need to be your best, yet small enough so you'll have easy access to it all, especially if you're in an Honors program.

Here you'll find peers you can rely on and people you can work with to create great things before you graduate. UNL Honors students include some of the best scholars from around the world. With an average 31.4 ACT (1380 SAT), last year incoming Honors students included 46 National Merit Finalists, nine National Hispanic Scholar Finalists, and seven perfect scorers.

When you consider NEBRASKA's tuition and the number of scholarships available, you'll be hard-pressed to find a better value for such great opportunities.


Community

Representing about 7% of total enrollment, NEBRASKA's Honors programs are home to a tight-knit community of scholars within the larger University, striking a unique balance of an intimate academic experience and a university that has all the resources you need to excel.

At NEBRASKA, you'll have all the opportunities you'd expect from a Big Ten University—cutting-edge research labs, top internship placements, access to professional leaders in your field of study, and the chance to compete in academic competitions at the international level.

Outside of the classroom, you'll also have access to a full Big Ten university experience—a vibrant campus culture, unmatched student life programs, and the growing city of Lincoln.

Thanks to the balance between community and opportunity, our scholars have gone on to do great things. NEBRASKA has helped prepare 95 Fulbright Scholars, 30 Goldwater Scholars, 22 Rhodes Scholars, 16 Truman Scholars, three Marshall Scholars and one Udall Scholar.


Research

At the college level, research is more than writing papers—it's about creating new knowledge.

We know you have good ideas and the aptitude to make them real. So we've developed a nationally-recognized program called UCARE (Undergraduate Creative Activities & Research Experiences) to connect talented and driven students like you with opportunities to do work that will help shape the future before you even graduate.

Best of all, as a part of UCARE, you'll get paid to work alongside world-class faculty while completing a meaningful research project—from discovering new meaning in works of art to completing foundational research that could lead to a cure for HIV—all before you graduate.

And as if making a positive difference in the world weren't enough reward, completing a UCARE project will give you a competitive edge when you apply to graduate school or for a job in your field.

Learn more

Campus Life

We know that great learning isn't confined to the walls of a classroom. It happens in the lab, in the field, and in a residence hall study room with your friends at 2 a.m. over Red Bull and Cheetos.

The peers you study with are what make college special. They're not only friends that will last a lifetime, they're partners traveling the same road as you, pushing and supporting you along the way to be your best. And you'll do the same for them.

Plus, if you join a learning community you'll live and learn together with students in the same area of study, interact with faculty more directly, and connect with upper-class mentors and alumni.

Learn more

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